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Courtesy can help sell a home

Courtesy can help sell a home

 
August 10, 2011
 
 
A recent New York Times article highlights the positive effect courtesy can have during all stages of selling a home. The real estate market is often stressful, and it is usually filled with parties on all sides who think that they know best.
 
One broker told the Times that even $100 is often an important issue when buying a home, and that anger and hostility frequently come out from buyers and sellers alike. A number of real estate agents emphasized the critical role good manners can play in getting a deal done.
 
The potential impact of courtesy
 
To show the potential impact of courtesy, the Times highlighted a real-life scenario where a professional hockey player was selling his home. A potential buyer sent a heartfelt letter to the player, stating how much of an honor it would be to live in the sports star's home. Another competing bidder offered more, but the player decided to go with the letter-writing buyer.
 
Another example involved a buyer who made his highest and final offer on a home, but the seller still wanted more money. The seller knew that the buyer was interested in installing a new window and door into the home, and he took it upon himself to do research on the installation. After the seller asked his agent to inform the buyer and tell him how much he wanted the deal to proceed, the buyer eventually offered more money.
 
When the lawyers get involved
 
According to the Times, several real estate agents noted that sales often become the most strained when lawyers become involved. In the majority of home sales, price negotiations often take place after a potential buyer has a home inspection of the building done. If things are found in need of repair, buyers sometimes get their lawyers to write letters demanding that the seller either reduce the price of the home or pay for the repairs, and sellers can easily get offended.
 
To avoid offense, one real estate agent told the Times it's wise for both buyers and sellers to remember that real estate is a business and should not be taken personally. This can be difficult for sellers, who often view their homes as the product of their lives up until that point.
 
The National Association of Realtors states that sellers are expected to be courteous and professional, and it's helpful for sellers to try to put some emotional distance between themselves and their property.
 

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